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Legendary Monks
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/21/2018 04:26:32

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Legendary Heroes-series clocks in at 39 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 30 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

As always, we begin with new archetypes, the first of which would be the Chakra Champion, who utilizes the Occult Adventures system, which, while interesting, ultimately falls short of what one can do with the premise…but that as an aside. What does the archetype do with it? The archetype replaces the 1st level bonus feat, providing Chakra Initiate, adding +1/2 monk level (minimum +1) to character level for the purpose of opening chakras. Later, the character may choose Chakra Adept and Master instead of bonus feats, ignoring prerequisites. This is a pretty big bumble in rules-integrity – the ability should specify that the archetype still has to select Chakra Adept before Chakra Master, ignoring all other prerequisites. RAW, you can choose Chakra Master before Chakra Adept. The archetype also gains disharmonious flux. After a damage-less touch attack or an unarmed strike, the character may trigger a disharmonious flux once per round as a free action. The target must succeed a Will-save (DC is governed by Wisdom) or take a -2 penalty (minus missing) on one of the saving throws, as chosen by the chakra champion. This penalty increases further at 8th and 16th level and lasts for Wisdom modifier rounds. Additionally, at 4th level and every 8 levels thereafter, an additional effect is added to targets that fail their save against disharmonious flux. A surprising 14 choices are presented, ranging from the expected extension of the penalties to e.g. attack rolls to some more creative ones: Being shaken while in total darkness, treating foes beyond 30 ft. as having concealment, basically disadvantage on saves versus Will-saves or an ability that allows the flux to affect mindless targets…which has a remnant from the original ability, referencing mesmerists instead of the chakra champion. Wait. What?? RAW, the ability has no indicator that it’s only supposed to affect creatures that have a mind – it is not codified as a mind-affecting ability! RAW, this is weird. The ability replaces stunning fist.

At 4th level, we get +1 point to the serpent-fire ki-pool, plus an additional one for every 4 levels thereafter. When awakening chakras, the archetype gets +1/2 monk level as a luck bonus to avoid the detrimental effects of serpent-fire. This replaces slow fall and the option to spend ki for additional attacks with flurry of blows. Starting at 7th level, the DC of disharmonious flux increases while a chakra is awakened or maintained, with the choice to alternatively gaining a buff to AC, atk, skills or saves. This bonus increases by +1 for every 3 levels thereafter. Minor complaint: The DC increase is per se not a bonus and while it is clear what the intention here is, RAW only the bonus scales. At 9th level, we get 1/minute maintaining an open chakra sans action expenditure. When opening a chakra, the archetype gets to roll both Fort- and Will-save and choose the better result and any chakra opened that has effects depending on number of open chakras increases that number by 50%. Chakras close at a rate of the highest in the first round, then 1d3. At 11th level, the chakra champion can start by awakening the heart chakra sans awakening the previous ones. Additionally, healing may be split between chakra champion and adjacent ally, if any, and conditions negated affect both. Finally, for ki expenditure, we can heal more conditions. This replaces diamond body.12th level nets a damage-less melee touch attack that can disrupt ki use and stagger the target for a number of rounds on a failed save, replacing abundant step. 15th level allows the chakra champion who has at least 2 chakras open, to expend ki or serpent-fire ki equal to ½ the open chakras, firing negative level causing rays at targets within 30 ft. I like what this archetype does with the chakra-engine, but I still maintain that redesigning the chakra-engine would have probably been smarter.

Anyways, next up would be the Crystallion, who uses crystals, enhancing defenses: Instead of evasion and its improved brethren, we get DR/Adamantine equal to ½ class level. Instead of fast movement, we het +1 natural armor, which increases by +1 for every 5 levels beyond 5th. The archetype also qualifies for Improved Natural Armor. This replaces fast movement. Manuever training is replaced with the option to inflict piercing or slashing damage with unarmed strikes and may use class level as BAB to qualify for critical feats. 4th level yields light while the character has at least 1 ki, and may use ki to duplicate daylight…but may not expend ki to grant herself a dodge bonus to AC. The archetype may generate scintillating light as a distraction bardic performance and use fascinate at -3 monk levels, as the bardic effect, with ki as governing attribute and ki as resource employed. This replaces slow fall. 5th level yields the option to dazzle nearby creatures while in proper light, with lesser illumination levels requiring ki expenditure. Alternatively, the archetype may temporarily blind nearby foes. At 7th level, we gain resistance 5 versus electricity and fire, which improves at later levels. Additionally, successful saves versus these effects can provide evasion-like benefits, with immediate action ki-expenditure providing improved evasion’s equivalent for such effects. However, the character becomes vulnerable to sonic damage. 13th level provides ray-deflection via ki expenditure; 15th level nets 1/day prismatic spray and the capstone nets a crystalline apotheosis to a construct-status, with ki-based prismatic spell use. I really liked this one – it feels like a natural fit for someone turning into a member of AAW Games’ amazing colliatur-race.

The Imperial guard archetype replaces Knowledge (religion) and Perform with Diplomacy and Knowledge (local) and gets the ability to designate a sworn charge, which may be re-designated pretty quickly, but the guard can’t have more than one at a given time. The archetype gets additional conditions to stunning fist, but blind/deafen is not permanent. 2nd level allows for the sharing of evasion between charge and guard as well as +2 to Reflex saves, with 9th level providing the option to get evasion’s benefits when either makes the save. 3rd level nets Bodyguard, which is more efficient for the monk’s charge and the bonus granted gets a duration based off Wisdom modifier; 6th level nets In Harm’s Way for such contexts. 4th level yields a bonus to a maneuver or a skill, gaining a +2 bonus here, with 10th level allowing the adding of Wisdom modifier to the chosen roll, with ki-cost associated. This replaces slow fall. Quivering palm is replaced; the archetype nets a retributive strike when defending targets, which explicitly increases critical multiplier and has synergy with other increases. 1/day, the character can designate a critical threat.

The psychic cenobite replaces evasion versus the equivalent for mind-affecting or psychic magic effects; at 9th level the character can absorb a number of spell levels of such effects, which must be designated prior to attempting a save. Cool, though the ability erroneously added a paragraph from the lesser version of the ability – it should replace improved evasion. 3rd level replaces maneuver training with +2 to saves versus psychic magic; 4th level replaces slow fall, wholeness of body and high jump with the ability to spend 1 point of ki to study a threatened target in melee as a swift action, immediately before making an attack. On a hit, the target saves and on a failure, the attack is a critical threat. This doesn’t work versus mindless targets. 11th level replaces diamond body with swift action, short-term true seeing or invisibility purge. The 15th level replacement for quivering palm is the seeding of a dominate monster effect with unarmed strikes or touches, including the option to set trigger conditions.

Singhala monks are Tiger Style specialists that are locked into the three feats of the style at 1st 6th and 10th level; 3rd level yields Diehard, with the threshold to remain conscious extended by Wisdom modifier and the option to use ki to ignore the staggered condition for one round, provided it is incurred due to negative hit points. Purity of body is replaced with immunity to fear, while 7th level replaces wholeness of body with Wisdom modifier minutes of speak with animals; cats and felines can be affected with a variety of themed spell effects for ki expenditure when talking to them, including simultaneous activation for more ki costs. 4th level lets the character use ki to enter a controlled rage; this is basically a barbarian rage, which scales and is powered by ki. It replaces evasion and diamond body. 9th level loses improved evasion and diamond soul in favor of AoE-fear-causing roars that can be used as a standard action or as a swift action after a full attack (cool!); higher levels allow for the causing of panic. 12th level replaces abundant step with the ki-activation-based benefits of haste, though the additional attack must be unarmed; alternatively, the character can effectively pounce for ki-expenditure; 15th level provides 1/day ki shout (instead of quivering palm) and 17th level removes the fatigue after controlled rages, replacing tongue of sun and moon.

The yogi monk replaces flurry of blows with yogic body: Meditate 1/day for 1 hour to gain an exceptional ability for 24 hours; starting at 8th and 15th level, the character gets to choose an additional ability per use of the class feature. A total of 9 such benefits are provided, and they all fit the flavor perfectly: We get the trick to move through smaller spaces and openings, better Escape Artist, delay toxins, Endurance, low-range blindsense, natural reach extension due to disjointed limbs (at the cost of a penalty of -2 to atk), slowed respiration, suppression of bleeding and boosts versus fatigue, sleep etc. – really cool. Yogis are locked into Psychic Sensitivity at 1st level and may use feats building on it as monk bonus feats, Instead of evasion and its improved brethren, the monk gets ½ class level uses of the samurai’s resolve, but does not regain resolve based on defeated opponents. Fast movement and maneuver training re replaced with the ability to use Wisdom instead of Str/Dex to calculate atk and CMB. 5th level nets the ability to use meditative drones, which behave as bardic fascinate and Wisdom as governing attribute, with ki as resource. This replaces high jump. Instead of slow fall and the ability to expend ki for additional flurry attacks, the 4th level yields yogic levitation, ki-based, better form of levitate or, well, alternatively, feather fall.

Okay, that covers the archetypes for the regular monk – let’s take a look at those for the unchained monk now, shall we? The first of these would be the flagellant, who gets Heal as a class skill. 2nd level lets the character use Wisdom for Intimidate instead of Charisma, as well as getting +1/2 class level to such checks, replacing the bonus feat. Instead of evasion, the flagellant gets pain tolerance, gaining a repeated save vs. pain effects in following rounds. 3rd level yields scarification – bleed damage is decreased, with higher levels providing further decreases. Additionally, we get immediate action and ki-based ignoring of ability damage/drain instead of fast movement. 4th level flagellants add +1d6 nonlethal damage to stunning fist uses, increasing by +1d6 every 4 levels thereafter; 8th level flagellants can render targets fatigued by stunning fist sickened. This replaces the AC bonus gained at 4th level and every 4 levels thereafter, but the archetype retains the Wisdom bonus to AC and CMD. 5th level nets the faith healing skill unlock, as well as phrenology occult skill unlock, using Knowledge (religion) as an alternate basis. The latter may be used with damaging, sharp needles etc., allowing for the implantation of permanently penalizing needles…nasty and really cool! This replaces purity of body. At 4th level, the flagellant can use cilices or similar pain-inducing armor to steel himself versus emotion, fear, etc. and 9th level yields Stalwart. The flagellant gets a total of 5 unique ki powers: Critical hit DR-ignoring and regeneration-suppression, expansion of pain tolerance; an intimidating glare; what about using ki to ignore up to twice the class level damage and gain temporary hit points of an equal amount (4x instead for nonlethal damage…) Really cool: When using pain tolerance and succeeding the second save, the character can choose to take the pain, activating a judgment or gain a ki point/stunning fist use – yes, it only lasts for a brief while and can’t be cheesed. This may also be activated after a critical hit was confirmed. Really cool archetype!

The leikung unchained monk replaces ki strike at 3rd level with a standard action sonic-damage-causing sonic damage that allows for stunning fist synergy, adding the deafened condition temporarily, with stacking durations. Alternatively, a weapon attack may be made, channeling the sonic damage through weaponry, with stunning fist synergy contingent on using a ki focus weapon. Thunderstrike may be held as a charge and it may also be fired as a ranged touch attack, though synergy with stunning fist costs an additional point of ki in that case. 5th level yields +4 to saves versus sonic effects, with 10th level providing resistance, which upgrades to 20 at 15th level and immunity to sonic effects and damage, replacing purity of body and the ki powers gained at 10th and 20th level. 7th level, leikungs can use move actions and ki to create a warhammer of half bludgeoning/sonic damage, which may be thrown. Creatures vulnerable to sonic treat the full damage as sonic. The weapon is wielded with Wisdom instead of Str/Dex and has a duration – if hurled during the duration, it may be decreased to re-manifest it sans cost, with higher levels unlocking +1 thundering and the weapon being treated as an adamantine weapon. It works as a monk weapon and the leikung is proficient. 9th level yields ki-based echolocation, replacing 9th level’s style strike. Also at this level, we get the ability to expend two points of ki for a ranged touch sonic wave, which may also be used as a cone-shaped burst. This replaces improved evasion.

The Shinsei has a heavy Rokugan-vibe, but that may be the Oriental Adventures fan in me; these fellows are a bit paladin-y: They must be lawful good and must accept at least one vow, for which they don’t get bonus ki. They get the paladin’s detect evil and smite, though the latter is governed by Wisdom. These replace flurry. 3rd level provides awakened recovery, which is basically rerolls versus fatigue or sleep-effects and at 7th level, rerolls versus exhaustion or being staggered; the shinsei can also spend ki to negate effects that cause sleep or being fatigued at 7th level. 10th and 16th level increase the ability to including stunning and death effects, respectively, with the progression allowing for the negation of previous effects. Minor nitpick: As written, it is not 100% clear if the upgraded 10th and 16th level negation effects require the expenditure of 2 ki as well, but from context, it is pretty evident how that’s supposed to work. 5th level nets the Sense Motive skill unlocks as well as those for the Intimidate skill, but the latter only versus targets of her smite. This replaces style strike at 5th level. 6th level replaces the ki power usually gained with a selection of oracle revelations from the ancestor mystery, at -3 levels, with Wisdom as governing attribute, and activation based on ki expenditure. An additional such ability is gained every 4 levels thereafter. 9th level provides Henshin Perfection instead of style strike: For 1 ki, the shinsei can shed light and gain 10 resistance or +4 to an ability score. 13th level provides stern silence, a ki-based short-range option to render targets mute or even, for more ki, inflict the caster croak spellblight. Cool! 17th level is pretty epic: It suppresses all magic on shinsei and target (as if affected by antimagic field), for a cool sudden-death-y climax trip.

The tempest gets a completely modified bonus feat list and replaces flurry of blows with skirmisher: If the tempest moves at least 10 feet before attacking with an unarmed attack or monk weapon, including ranged weapons used within 30 ft. of the target, any successful attacks deal +1d6 damage, +1d6 ever 4 levels after that; this may be foregone for AoO-less reposition. At 3rd level and every 4 levels thereafter, the tempest also gains +1 dodge bonus to AC when the target has moved thus, though the ability requires not carrying medium/heavy load or being fatigued/staggered. 3rd level lets the character use ki to enhance speed temporarily for +30 ft., replacing the option to spend ki to add an attack to flurries; 4th level provides twice the natural healing, but the tempest must eqat twice as much as well and has a harder time to stave off starvation due to the increased metabolism. At 4th level, the tempest doesn’t lose Dex-mod when running and no increased DC when using full-speed Acrobatics, Climb, Stealth, Survival – this replaces still mind. 5th level provides he option to spend ki to reduce exhaustion to fatigue or negate fatigue, but not those caused by hunger- Style strikes work in conjunction with skirmishing instead of flurry of blows. 15th level nets the option to run to gain various glimpses of the future – really cool. 18th level provides basically advantage on Reflex saves/Acrobatics instead of flawless mind.

Now here is the thing: The archetype replaces ki powers with speed stunts; first gained at 4th level, an additional one is gained every 2 levels thereafter. This list is HUGE: We get more than 3 pages (!!) of individualized stunts, which include zig-zagging run, wind jumps, wall-running, acting in surprise rounds, dragging allies along with them, making attacks during a full-round twice-movement full-round action; quick opening/closing doors or similar actions as part of move actions, plane shift…notice something? This archetype makes the monk a great skirmisher AND quotes a lot of our favorite speedster tropes (including high-level speed phantoms or sonic shattering), clothing them is a subdued guise. Amazing class-hack!

The voidmind, finally, is another uncommon concept: The archetype adds all Knowledge skills as class skills and replaces ki strike with the ability to use ki to duplicate a variety of divination SPs that increase over the levels. 7th level provides the option to use ki to grant allies temporarily bonus feats or skill ranks; feats for which the voidmind does not qualify are more costly, unless touching a character who has it. The creature thus granted the feat must still qualify for the bonus feat granted. This replaces style strike at 5th level. 9th level nets fold fate, which nets ki-based bonuses equal to class level; Wis-mod if used after results being known. 13th level nets the ability to touch an ally and let him use Wisdom modifier instead of a touched target’s ability score modifier for a chosen ability score. 17th level nets the option to cause temporary negative levels or penalize physical ability scores, based on Wisdom modifier, with ki-use required. This should probably have a daily cap beyond ki; Con can be pretty deadly pretty fast and a properly min-maxed voidmind can probably kill most targets in two rounds...

Okay, after this massive chapter of archetypes, we take a look at the chapter honor and vows, which provides a total of 10 new vows – thankfully sans the annoying still mind-prerequisite; prerequisite-wise, we only require a ki pool, which means that, in conjunction with e.g. Legendary Games cool archetypes or similar WuXia-supplements, we can greatly expand the usefulness of these vows beyond the confines of the monk class. Speaking of which: The Ki Meditation feat to grant ki to characters, first depicted in LG’s The Way of Ki, is reprinted for your convenience here. Kudos! The first vow wowed me – extremely materialistic, the vow of hard gold makes a perfect fit for Karzoug’s minions: The monk may not give gifts etc. and becomes extremely materialistic. Vow of knowledge ties you to the protection of academic texts, while vow of the ki-weapon represents an obsession to the exclusive use of a weapon. Vow of obedience is self-explanatory and ties you to a master; vow of self-sacrifice adds to that, tying the monk to a ward. (Cool: Trouble-shooting advice included!) Vow of secrecy makes you sworn to secrecy and vow of sightlessness is a willful blindness, while the vow of simplicity prevents manipulation of emotions and flourished speeches; vow of superiority is really cool as well, while the vow of total freedom prevents marriage or being burdened by any physical or metaphysical bond.

A huge plus: We get a massive list of psychic spells codified for the qinggong monk. Extremely useful and the ki-to-power-ratios is sound. The pdf then proceeds to depict ki tattoos – basically a universal archetype-y option for monks, replacing their bonus feats. At 1st level and every 3 levels thereafter, the monk gets a magical tattoo, which may be activated as a move action or as a swift action as part of a move action 1/day; further activation costs ki and saves, if any, are governed by Wisdom. The list includes rerolls, SPs, bonus feats, brief boosts to ability scores, the stalwart defender’s defensive stance, self-haste. Solid.

Then, we get to my favorite component of the whole book: Ki tomes! These are basically unique grimoires that contain special techniques and powerful tricks, akin to the nice books contained in Meditations of the Imperial Mystics. This contextualizes the abilities in an easy to integrate manner in the game, adding unique flavor to the options presented. Meditating upon these books can allow the character to learn specific tricks, either permanently when leveling up or temporarily. The first of these would be the Text of Burning Wind and Iron Rain, is unique: Crane Reversal is e.g. a potent upgrade of the Crane Style and pretty cool (though it should NOT have the style descriptor – as a character can usually only be in one style, and as this feat builds on Crane Style, that descriptor is wrong here.); Empty Hand Weapon lets you deflect missiles while holding a monk weapon (cool!) and Flow of the Firearm provides actual monk/gunslinging synergy – and guess what – those are just the first 3 feats! Making the flying blade a monk weapon is nice and a whole series of feats deals with monk weapon improvements, which is pretty damn cool! Further gunslinging tricks follow alongside Reflect Arrows…and have I mentioned ranged attacks with light weapons or increased shuriken range? Yeah pretty cool – though the subsequent taking of the shuriken upgrade multiple times should have minimum level requirements to prevent abuse.

The second tome herein would be To Serve Stone’s Stern Will, a poetic recount of a servitor-cult of shaitan requires adherence to vows, but upon mastering the basics, earth affinity may be gained, with further ki powers unlocking SPs…and the feats include Earth Gliding and the Sevenfold Stone Curse, which is a glorious blend of ki, earth affinity…and has the option to push targets into frickin’ stone! Glorious! Can we please have more? (And yes, they have amazing artworks!)

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting on a rules-language level are tight, if not perfect, in spite of the complexity of the material; on a formal level, we have more glitches than usual for Legendary Games, making the book only good in that category. Layout adheres to Legendary Games’ two-column full-color standard and the book sports quite a few nice full-color artworks, though fans of LG will be familiar with most of them. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Jason Nelson, Clinton Boomer and Jesse Brenner deliver a really cool supplement of monk options here. The complex archetypes presented within run the gamut from inspired to nice and the supplemental material is well worth checking out. The tempest, vows and ki tomes in particular really made me smile from ear to ear, in spite of the vast amount of monk material I’ve read. That being said, there are slightly more small components that could be a bit more streamlined than what I’d like to see – chakra champion or the damage-increase of shuriken sans scaling minimum levels, for example, are two such examples. The latter can be rationalized away by the context of the tome, but still – there are a few such instances that feel like they could have used a bit more scrutiny. That being said, I am complaining at a high level here. As a whole, I consider this very much worth getting, though I can’t round up from my final verdict of 4.5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Monks
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Mythic Monsters #45: Middle East
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/19/2018 04:35:52

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Legendary Games‘ Mythic Monster-series (which has revolutionalized how I use bosses in non-mythic games, but that as an aside) clocks in at 28 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 2 pages of introduction, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page inside of back cover, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 17 pages of content – it should be noted, though, that like in all LG-books, there is A TON of text on each page, so the simple page numbers may be misleading.

Anyways, we begin this installment, as all of them, with supplemental material – and this time around, we get awesomeness. Not only do we start with duststorms, sandstorms and flensing sandstorms, with proper rules, we also get three complex hazards: The CR 10 deadly dunes are racing dunes that behave somewhat like swarms –though they are merciless and unfeeling as nature is wont to be; Shadow sand can add a whole new level to the desert sans suffused with dark powers, leeching both light and life from those that traverse it: “And lo! Deep within the fabled dunes of yore, there lies the black wasteland, where the living dead wander freely on grains of black under the dimmed sun, where ruins loom and the master’s black pyramid rises…” Sorry, couldn’t help myself. Beyond those, we have a nice call-back to the classic “Desert of Desolation” boxed set, with the glassy sea as a new terrain that not only causes extreme heat – crystal crevasses and razor-sharp glass make navigating these parts wondrous and deadly. A fantastic lead-in for the subject matter, so let’s see whether this installment’s monsters hold up!

We begin with a classic, the formerly psionic, green unicorn-bunny creature called Almiraj, which in Pathfinder may have lost its psionics…but in its CR 1/MR 1-version, it does hearken closer to the mythology, gaining a petrifying gore as well as the option to devour targets whole. And yes, it has a weakness as well. Amazing rendition of the critter! The juvenile Rukh, at CR 4/MR 1 is slightly less interesting in comparison, but we also get an adult iteration at CR 12/MR 5, which exudes necrotic energy as a desecrate aura – and woe to those that slay these gigantic two-headed vultures…all that energy must go somewhere…

On the lower end of the CR spectrum, we can also find one of the Div, the Doru, at CR 3/MR 1, who can use mythic power to duplicate legend lore and pronounce curses of misfortune, making the pretty bland standard creature rather exciting…we need the information…do we risk the curse? CR 5/MR 2 nets us the second div, the Aghash can bypass protection from evil with mythic power, for a better gaze; they can also AoO-less dimension door through the sandstorms they cause. Oh, and disfiguring touch that also adds potential control over victims. OUCH. The third div herein would be the CR 8/MR 3 Pairaka makes targets affected by plagues or the lustful dreams it inspires more susceptible…and, in a pretty cool detection-avoidance stunt, it can freely adjust its alignment.

The mythic version of the mighty Dybbuk clocks in at CR 18/MR 7 can become dormant upon possessing a target, evading detection and potent magics to expel it, while camouflaging its presence. It can, while unseen, demoralize targets with whispers and their touch can substitute 2d4 rounds of stun when using mythic power, instead of the usual damage. Malevolence is upgraded as well and mythic dybbuks can spread their essence between multiple objects…oh, and they can control constructs and mindless undead. And their aura can paralyze targets. Really, really nasty power-beyond-throne/infiltrator/killer/-type of monster! The Owb, at CR 7/MR 3, is cloaked in cold that damages those nearby; it can also implant suggestions and provide a boon to an ally with mythic power. The Girtablilu, at CR 10/MR 4 can clairaudience/voyance with a radius of 1 mile, and even share this via mythic power; they can also gate via mythic power. Oh. And there’s this small thing in line with mythology. The gaze. Which causes slay living. Oh yes. Your PCs will suffer.

In the higher CR/MR-echelons, we can find the CR 17/MR 7 Peri…and it actually is in line with the full scope of mythology; imbued by the blood of a dying martyr, they get constant freedom of movement. It may be shared with mythic power or Constitution damage; the peri has taken the breath of a maiden, who willingly succumbed to disease to be with her lover, rendering her immune to disease – once more, this can be shared. As former shepherds of disasters, they can invoke deadly SPs, which may be upgraded to mythic versions. The past still haunts them, making them never count as good, in spite of their alignment. Complaint: The purifying flames ability mentions being half holy – a damage-type that does not exist in Pathfinder. In their quest for redemption, they have taken on the tear of an old man, who saw the error of his ways, gaining constant heroism…All in all, amazing narratives via abilities, but the holy damage-reference annoyed me slightly. At this point in time, every designer out there should know about that one.

Anyways, there are two other really mighty creatures herein: Ar CR 22/MR 9, the Taniniver may expend mythic power to exude a cloud of Strength-draining miasma and crits with claws add massive penalties to resist the deadly disease these carry. They can use mythic power to bypass disease-immunity or substitute regular diseases with deadly taniniveri spoil. And yes, the diseases carried are much more virulent and potent…OUCH. Another mega-potent creature herein would be mighty Humbaba, at CR 23/MR 9, who can use mythic power to reduce damage from a single source to 45, also boosting its DR/epic in the process. They can also generate a veil with a fascination effect; nonmythic creatures suffer from automatically-confirmed crits at maximum damage; for mythic power expenditure, that may also be used versus mythic targets. The gaze of the Humbaba can ground flyers and it gets perfect awareness of its territory…and, the entity can generate flight-less wings for wing attacks. Ouch.

Now, as always, we also get a new creature, the Buraq, which uses Mythic Wind Stance in the build, reproduced for your convenience here. The creature gets CR 11/MR 4 and is actually good – the kind Buraq can ride impossible distances across the night sky with its rider, as if by shadow walk. This lasts until landing or sunrise. The buraq gets powerful trample and silver hooves; buraqs don’t need food and can live on the benevolence of others. Their gorgeous tail can cause fascination and with mythic power, the buraq can use prismatic spray. On the back of buraqs, time holds no meaning – time ceases to flow, allowing the buraq to save those mortally wounded or grant them a respite from certain doom. We get a full, flavorful write-up of these creatures, including ecology etc., and their full-color artwork is really nice. Very flavorful critter!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good on both a formal and rules-language level. Layout adheres to a two-column full-color standard and the pdf sports 3 neat full-color artworks I haven’t seen before, two of which are full-page artworks that you can use as a handout of sorts. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Loren Sieg, Victoria Jaczko and Jason Nelson deliver big time here; it is obvious that the authors researched the myths and dove deep into the concepts to make the creatures more unique. The peri, apart from the minor holy damage glitch, would be one instance where you frankly can’t emphasize enough how cool this rendition is in comparison to the regular peri. Similarly, the design-paradigms employed make sense – divs focus on their themes; magical beasts are effective; undead more frightening. The design is excellent and makes the critters stand out, tapping into real world myths, the Arabian Nights, and beyond, to enhance creatures in a rather glorious manner. In spite of the smaller hiccup, pretty much everything is amazing in this book; this is an excellent example of why I love this series. My final verdict is 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Monsters #45: Middle East
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Mythic Minis 105: Halloween Treats
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/16/2018 11:34:19

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The second part of the pdf contains 4 detailed magic items, all with prices and construction requirements properly noted. The first would be the Ghostly Gossamer…which is basically…aspooky ghost sheet. You know, the “Ghost costume” most of us will have used at one point…only it actually works as ghostly disguise and its duration per day may be decreases to get miss chances generated by ghostly specters. Mythic characters obviously gain further benefits from it, namely ghost touch armor and the ability to expend mythic power to actually become incorporeal! Really cool!

The goblin mask helps with a ragged, comical illusion that allows for reduce person size decreases. While in effect, this enhances Bluff and steal maneuvers as well as feinting. Additionally, non-evil creatures have a hard time attacking the wearer. The DC to resist this properly codified effect can be increased by mythic wearers with mythic power, using surge die or to bypass immunity to mind-affecting effects. Cool: While reduced in size, the wearer may change the effects of the mask from “adoring” to “OMG, run”-levels of horrific, much in accordance with PFRPG’s delightfully wicked goblins. This also changes the bonuses to focus on Intimidate and dirty tricks and also the effect of the harmless guide. Really cool two-phase item…and mythic wearers get more control over shifting item modes and when the respective boosts are available…and it adds a buff to the wearer when foes fall prey to the mask’s attack-preventing effects. Two thumbs up!!

The sack of gluttony is twisted: It contains sweets that act as beguiling gifts and eating a single sweet from it sends the consumer into a spiral of gorging itself, requiring no less than 3 consecutive, successful saves, with stomach cramps following potentially right after the effect. Mythic users can enhance the DC via surge die (first AND consecutive saves!) and non-mythic targets may suffer from the effect of feast of ashes for days after such a binge. The sack, however, may also be used for beneficial purposes, allowing the wearer to use mythic power to create candy versions of objects placed within, duplicating allfood or alternatively, transform elixirs and potions into candy with the same effects. Cool!

The final item herein would be the legendary witch’s broom, a broom of flying that can be bonded only by a mythic creature being part of a coven or capable of using hexes. It may be ridden by the witch or her familiar and either may not be dismounted from the broom; while not truly sentient, the broom attempts to take paralyzed, stunned, etc. riders into cover/concealment etc. at the rider’s will. Familiars riding the broom with their master gain cover and immunity to non-mythic hexes, curses and fear-effects. The pair also gets greater familiar link, as the archmage ability, while riding the broom. While mounted, the character may roll her surge die twice, taking the better result, when using it to enhance CL casting a witch spell, using spell-trigger/completion items or making saves versus hexes, curses or witch spells. Additionally, when casting a witch spell or using a hex, the witch may use a mythic power to gain a variety of archmage tricks. The broom has two uses of legendary power and 2 active abilities: Evasion or improved evasion while riding the broom or (augmented) mythic fly. It has a hardness of 10, 30 hp and is immune to sundering from non-mythic targets.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no serious glitches. Layout adheres to legendary Games’ two-column full-color standard and the pdf has a nice full-color artwork. The pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Jason Nelson’s supplemental pdf of Halloween-themed mythic tricks is not only amazing during the season: Each of the items herein is strong enough to carry a whole plot/investigation, featuring several cool, complex tricks. The feats are evocative as well…and the pdf gets the fascinating duality of Halloween as something both creepy and enjoyable, mirroring this flavor in the design-paradigm employed. I loved each and every aspect herein, and can see myself using them all, regardless of context. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval. Very much recommended, even beyond the spooky season!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 105: Halloween Treats
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Splintered Godhood
by Monica G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/16/2018 11:32:08

We played this game at NonCon 2018 at Sheboygan, WI and this is reviewd by William Paprocki Splintered Godhood is a one-shot adventure for 4-5 people, based on a game called Acts of Evil. It has simple, self-contained rules and a formulaic story with some great options for variation. It sounds simple enough--but the game can be very rich, complex, and a great outlet for creativity. This is a game best run and played by highly-creative and improvisational people. As part of game play, each player creates a world and a character that lives in it. Other players can add twists to a given player's world and character. The players start in their respective worlds and eventually travel to other planes of existence to join together to either compete or cooperate toward an ultimate goal (no spoilers about what that goal is). This is a great game for seasoned role-players who like storytelling. This would probably be an amazing game to play with improvisational actors, or really anyone who interested in role-playing who has a creative streak. Keep in mind that this is a game of creative, improvisational storytelling--but it is at heart a horror game. Adding twists to other players' worlds and characters are best when they are dark and can drive the story. The main challenge of the game seems to be for the game master, who has to take what he is given by the players and turn it into a coherent story that follows the formula provided by the rules. This is a challenge, so I recommend this for seasoned GMs. Also, the rulebook recommends taking breaks occasionally to allow players to use the bathroom or grab a snack and for the GM to make decisions about how the story will go. Definitely do so. The GM might also benefit from some forethought about how they will run the game. Nothing beats creativity and improvisation--those features are what make the game interesting. Read more of our review at: (https://www.geeksagogo.com/single-post/2018/02/13/Splintered-Godhood-RPG-Review)



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Splintered Godhood
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Mythic Monsters #44: Elementals
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/12/2018 08:44:26

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Mythic Monsters-series clocks in at 34 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial,1 page SRD, 1 page ToC, 2 pages introduction/hot to use, 3 pages advertisement, 1 page inside of back cover, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 22 pages of content, so let’s take a look, shall we?

As always, we begin with supplemental material: This time around, that includes two feats: Elemental Expert provides a bonus to Knowledge checks pertaining the elemental planes and increases the maximum HD and decreases the Charisma score of outsiders of the elemental subtype when using planar ally etc. to negotiate with the entities. The mythic version of the feat increases the bonus granted and allows for mythic power expenditure for SP detect elementals. Additionally, summoning elementals via summon monster/Nature’s ally is treated as +1 spell level. Vengeful Summons is an amazing feat for outsiders: After having been called, the outsider may remain for some time, trying to hunt down the summoner….which should be easy, courtesy of a mental link. The mythic version adds quarry to the fray. Glorious feat! The pdf then proceeds to depict 5 conjure elemental spells, the aforementioned detect elemental, as well as mythic versions for both spells, the former of which comes with a 6th tier augment for mythic simple templates added. The book then proceeds to portray a new template, the fission elemental at CR +1, once more, with a mythic upgrade: The template is pure amazing: Basically, the template allows an elemental to collapse into swarm form and reconstitute itself into a fused form. Really damn cool! The mythic version even sports the ability to use mythic power when changing forms for elemental eruptions. Pretty damn cool!

All right, but you’re here for the new mythic critters, right? So, the first would be the CR 13/MR 5 aerial savant: Evasion while far enough from the floor, the option to carry off targets and death attacks should make clear that the mythic upgrade of these fellows is a brutal foe; The build makes use of the mythic Step Up and Step Up and Strike feats for superb skirmishing, with both feats reprinted here for your convenience. Know what’s beautiful, deadly and two pages long? The CR 22/MR 9 mythic anemos: Dispelling winds are cool…but for mythic power-expenditure, these fellows can emit brutal blasts of searing hot or freezing cold wind, heal or cause nonlethal damage to foes. They also can direct the wind to carry messages and e.g. overhear a ton of conversations….and yes, bestowing the blessing of winds and a defensive aura complement this majestic monstrosity. Really cool!

On the other end of CR and elemental spectrum, the Crysmal at CR 4/MR 1, gains the ability to heal via the consumption of jewels as well as a more powerful spiked defense. In a cosmetic cut-copy-paste glitch, the former ability incorrectly refers to the grootslang instead of the crysmal. The classic scanderig, first introduced in the PF AP #4, can also be found: The ore-eating foregfiend clocks in at CR 13/MR 5: We get bonus damage with attacks and a cool upgrade for the searing spew, which makes the metal stack to foes…and as perhaps my favorite ability, they can turn themselves into living wrecking balls. Heck yeah!

Regarding the forces of earth, we also get the CR 8/MR 3 earth veela. Like the other two veelas at the same CR/MR, these receive a beckoning dance that may cause targets to dance with them, which may well be lethal for mere mortals… earth vela can also animate nearby plants, interacting further with the beckoning dance. As a full-round action, the earth veela can cause silence as well as AoE staggering powered by mythic power. Fire veelas are temperamental, gaining the option to fire bolts of flame, which may ignore resistance/immunity – and woe to anyone who spurns them; they don’t take well to being resisted! The water vela receives a captivating song and may hide within the reflections of water. Cool! Edit: Here, I originally wondered about the lack of the air veela - Turns out, I forgot that it had been already released in Mythic Monsters: Slavic. Mea culpa!

While we’re on the subject of water: The mythic tojanida clocks in at CR 6/MR 2 and may fire brine jets and tear apart armor – nice! The Magmin clocks in at CR 3/MR 1 and may use mythic power to superheat its body…and they may eat flames, healing themselves. On the low-level end, the pdf also nets notes for mythic mephitis, at CR 4/MR 1 – a total of 9 variant mephitis are provided, each of which gains a unique breath weapon, as well as a defensive ability that ranges from salt armor to ooze bodies. Minor complaint: The Ice Mephit subheader was not properly formatted, looking like plain text.

At CR 13/MR 5, we also gain a total of 4 different elementals of less common compositions: The ice elemental can conjure forth blizzards and heal itself with ice, and its cold is numbing and staggers foes. The lightning elemental can fire arcs of electricity, transform into lightning and crash through foes, move through metal and use mythic power to create potent, magnetic bursts or charge itself with energy that makes attacking it unwise. The magma elemental can glide through earth and erupt in powerful bursts, lob globs of magma and it may reduce most substances to slag and it may vomit forth a puddle of lava. The mud elemental can use mythic power to drown those entrapped in mud; it can alter its form via polymorph and when it is hit it may use mythic power to attempt to suck weapons into itself…or hold fast unarmed/natural attacks. The build of this fellow is supplemented by the mythic Awesome Blow and Quick Awesome Blow feats.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are excellent on a rules-language level. On a formal level, I noticed a few minor hiccups, though none of them compromise rules-integrity. Layout adheres to legendary Games’ neat 2-column full-color standard and the pdf sports some really nice full-color artworks. Fans of LG may be familiar with some of them. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Jason Nelson and Steven T. Helt (or Alex Riggs, Jason Nelson and Victoria Jaczko – the supplement has two author-lines in a weird glitch) deliver an amazing series of mythic upgrades for the often maligned elementals. In d20-based systems, elementals often fall rather short of how cool they actually should be. Where in other games, elemental spirits have a ton of creative abilities, in PFRPG, they instead often feel like the dumb grunts of the outsiders, the things that you summon if calling upon djinn or demons/devils/angels/etc. is too risky. This book helps change that: The elemental creatures within get a ton of cool, diverse options that allow them to do things beyond just bashing foes and casting the usual suspects of SPs. So yeah, design-wise, I love this…particularly the fission template. Its effects should imho be standard for elemental creatures. They consist of an element, so a degree of control over shape etc. makes sense and is something you can observe in many other games. The dual forms also add a level of tactics to them that makes them more interesting for the GM to run. So yeah, really, really cool.

Apart from the minor hiccups mentioned, I enjoyed this very much. My final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up for the purpose of this platform. Seriously, fission elemental benefits should be the standard and makes owning this worthwhile on its own.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Monsters #44: Elementals
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Legendary Shifters
by Trent H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/09/2018 17:10:29

So if you had any issues with the old shifter, this fixes them. The change to wildshape, the unique archetypes, the new class features, they're all amazing. It's kind of awesome to see how the base of this class was taken and made into something that actually does what you'd want from the class. Five stars, easy.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Shifters
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The Robot Summoner
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/07/2018 04:25:48

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This pdf clocks in at 24 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of explanation of how to use this, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of SRD, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 14 pages of content, though it should be noted that, as always with Legendary Games, we get a lot of content per page.

First of all: No, your class does not have the lame “Robot Summoner”-name – that is only for the purpose of, you know, making sure you know what you get. The class is called “Steel Soul”, which sounds damn metal to me. The steel soul is a variant of the unchained summoner and sports ¾ BAB-progresion, good Will-saves d8 HD, 2 + Int skills per level and proficiency with simple weapons and light armor. The steel soul does not suffer from arcane spell failure chance when casting spells in light armor. Spellcasting is spontaneous and governed by Charisma, with 5th level and every 3 levels thereafter providing the option to lose a spell in favor of a new one. Spellcasting goes up to 6th level and sports its own spell list: The list is detailed, with more uncommon spells hyperlinked. The list makes use of UM, UC, ACG, and, of course, the Technology Guide.

A key feature that is available to the class from the get-go would be the nanite link, which allows for the robot to apply the steel soul’s Charisma modifier to the save DC of the robot’s abilities. As a standard action (extraordinary, fyi) that does not provoke AoOs, the steel soul may use nanite surge, healing a robot touched by 1d6 points of damage, which increases by +1d6 at 3rd level and every odd level thereafter. The robot summoner may use this ability 3 + Charisma modifier times per day.

Of course, the class does get a robot companion. The robot gains ¾ BAB-progression, 1/4th save-progression and begins play with 2 skills, which increases to up to 30 at 20th level. Robots with high Intelligence modify this accordingly. They per se have no class skills, unless an upgrade explicitly grants them – more on that later. They begin play with one feat and increase that to up to 8. 2nd level yields a Str/Dex-bonus of +1, which increases to up to +8 at 20th level. A first level robot has a maximum number of 3 attacks, which increases to a maximum of 7 at 19th level. At 2nd level, the robot gains +2 to AC, half that amount (+1) to hardness, which scales up to +16/+8, respectively. Robots may not wear armor, so this is a pretty crucial defense component. Robots begin play with low-light vision and darkvision 60 ft. as well as share spells. As robots, they are immune to ability drain and damage, bleed, death effects, disease, energy drain, exhaustion, fatigue, mind-affecting effects, necromancy effects, nonlethal damage, paralysis, poison, sleep effects and stun.

An important balancing tool between robot and steel soul would be that they share magic item slots: If the robot wears a ring, the steel soul may not wear more than one ring, for example. This alone would not suffice to make the robot okay, though: The list of immunities is pretty massive, after all. The Achilles’ heel of the robot would be critical hits: Whenever the robot takes damage from a crit, it must succeed a DC 15 Fort-save (remember: Sucky, sucky saves…) or be stunned for a round; on a success, the robot is still staggered. The robot retains immunity against other sources of the stun condition (nice catch!). Additionally, robots are vulnerable to electricity damage. 2nd level yields evasion and 15th level improved evasion. At 9th level, we either get Multiattack, or, if the robot does not have 3+ natural attacks, a second attack with one natural weapon at -5 to BAB; basically, an iterative attack. Also at 9th level, the robot gains integrated weapon, allowing the robot to treat a technological weapon as a natural weapon, which includes proficiency as well as the option to fire in melee sans incurring AoOs.

Robots may be quadruped, biped or serpentine regarding their base forms, with upgrades, stats and movement rates etc. between them being rather well-balanced. The evolution-equivalent would be upgrades. These may be changed whenever the steel soul gains a new level, and the robot begins with one upgrade point, increasing that up to 15 at 20th level for a ¾ progression analogue to BAB. Weapon upgrades may not be disarmed and a few are base form exclusives or have minimum levels as prerequisites. There are upgrades with a point-value ranging from 1 to 4, presented by point value first and within each category, alphabetically. Among the 1-point upgrades, we can find, for example, advanced programming for a skill for +8 to it; similarly, weapon proficiency can be found, with climb speed, bite, reach, increased damage die for a natural attack, etc. We can also get a tail (and a tail slap), a tentacle or pincers or a dart gun that can deliver poison or acid. Push and pull can also be found and e.g. minor save boosts or increased natural armor may be found as well as an AC-upgrade versus beams and rays. Oh, and yes, the robot, if large enough, can become a mount!

The 2-point upgrades include increased ability scores (with a level cap for multiple uses to prevent abuse) as well as increased skill points or proficiencies. Temporary flight via booster jets, adding electricity damage to attacks or gaining a chainsaw or a laser torch can be found here. Grab and constrict as well as poison and pounce or trample can be found here. Additionally, additional arms can be found and a net-gun is offered as well. There also are wheels, which tie in with the number of legs the robot has. Among the 3-point upgrades, we can find blindsense, energy immunity or the ability to see invisible creatures. Integrated pistols can include arc pistol, laser pistol, sonic pistol and zero pistol. There also is a slow self-healing option here and the upgrade for a charged weapon that can end up stunning targets on crits. The 4-point upgrades include blindsight, chameleon circuitry (Hide in plain sight variant), upgrade to Large size (or Huge for +6 points, yes, with minimum level requirements, obviously), fast healing (with a proper minimum level) and several rifles can be found: Arc, laser, sonic and zero rifles may be equipped. Finally, the robot can have a force field of temporary hit points – while in effect, this also protects against critical hits.

These robots may be summoned by the respective steel soul in 1 minute from a 1-way underground vault and dismissing it is a standard action. I like this tech-y notion of an underground robot factory with gating etc. rather well – the 2nd level summon robot spell presented here also employs this.

2nd level yields Craft Construct for the steel soul, but until 5th level, he may only use this to repair his robot as per the rules to build and modify constructs. At 5th level, constructs created cost half as much, but the steel soul may only create mostly metal constructs, and the constructs thus created are robots, but they lack a proper long-term power-source, only lasting for 1 level per class level, with recharges costing ½ the cost to craft. Nice way to allow for multiple robots without breaking the game. Starting at 4th level, the steel soul gains +2 to AC and saves (bonus types correct – kudos!) while in reach of the robot, but only while the robot is not grappled, etc. 12th level doubles this bonus and makes the benefits also apply to allies. At 18th level, these bonuses further increase by +2 and the robot may also share the benefits of a variety of different, defensive upgrades.

At 6th level, the steel soul can dimension door the robot to his side 1/day, +1/day for every 4 levels thereafter. At 8th level, the steel soul may use two uses of the nanite healing ability to use it at close range instead. 10th level allows for the expenditure of 2 charges to temporarily grant the robot fast healing 2 for 1 minute, which increases by +1 at 12th level, 4 at 16th and 5 at 20th level. This may explicitly e used in conjunction with the robot’s fast healing. At 16th level, the nanite healing ability may be activated as a swift action instead. The capstone is instant restoration, which lets the steel soul 1/day use all nanite healing charges as an immediate action (min 1 required) to instantly restore the robot to full functionality and hit points.

The class does not come with any favored class options, supplemental feats or archetypes.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are as tight and good as we’ve come to expect from Legendary Games – the class works smoothly as presented. Layout adheres to the nice two-column full-color standard of the Iron Gods-plug-ins. The pdf comes with a second, more printer-friendly version. Artworks are full color and nice, though fans of Legendary Games will be familiar with most of them. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Jeff Lee’s steel soul class is a really good take on the trope of the robot summoner. The modified spell list and eidolon chassis make this variant class feel surprisingly distinct and are executed well. The class is 100% functional for the table and should provide no issues. While 14th level at first glance looks like a dead level, we get +1 maximum number of attacks and an upgrade for the robot, so I’m fine with the steel soul only getting new slots. Craftsmanship-wise, I have nothing to complain about regarding what’s here. I do have a bit of an issue with what’s not here, though: The lack of favored class options, archetypes, sample NPC or supplemental feats is a bit sad to see. I also couldn’t shake the feeling that, engine-wise, this fellow could have carried more. As written, the steel soul is pretty much the healing battery for the robot, which, while not bad, undersells the concept a bit. The nanite angle could have yielded something really cool: You know, short-term boosts for the robot that upgrade the upgrades granted. Bursts of plasma; pummeling fields…the flashy stuff. An engine based on such interaction would have felt a tad bit more unique than this fellow.

So yeah, as a whole, I enjoyed the steel soul. It is a distinct class that feels like a variant, but also has its unique identity. While it undersells its premise a bit, as a whole, I consider this to be worth checking out, though it does fall a bit short of the greatness it could have been. My final verdict will be 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Robot Summoner
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Legendary Gunslingers
by Hal K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/19/2017 16:43:43

The Legendary Gunslingler is an amazing improvement over Paizo's existing class, expanding on it in every way while still maintaining its flavor and base designs. The addition of a ton of unique and interesting Archetypes that expand on the classes capabilities and roles is just the icing on top of an already amazing cake.

If you love Firearms in your Fantasy, I can't recommend this book enough, and I plan to push it on all of my players who have interest in playing a gunslinger.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Gunslingers
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Legendary Gunslingers
by Dave N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/17/2017 12:22:38
If any of you are familiar with the Legendary Heroes line you'll largely know what to expect here. Following a recent trend of redesigning some of the more problematic Pathfinder classes into something more managable and exciting, the Legendary Gunslinger captures the theme and fatasy of the class much better than the original. While it looks at first glance to be a downgrade with having only 3/4 BAB, the class comes out stronger for it and doesn't lose anything that it will miss. Gun mysteries allow for much more customization for your gunslinger, allowing you to feel differenet than ohters of the same class. It is a thoughtful and precise redesign that I'll be suggesting to anyone who was dissapointed in the original class. The suplement's only real weakness is the archetypes. They range from incredibly reliant on flavor without giving any good benefits (Faded Stranger) to not seeming to function very well at all. The latter issue is very aparent in the Anthem Gunner archetype, which I very much wanted to like. As written though, it provides a weaker version of inspire courage for less of a duration and if you shoot your gun during this time, the effect ends. I'm perplexed as to what the Anthem Gunner is meant to do during this time, since shooting a gun is literally the main point of the class. Some of the archetypes hit their mark expertly, like the Pale Slinger and Corssbow Killer, which makes the weaker archetypes even more dissapointing. Overall I do recommend this book to anyone who wants to shake up gunplay in their campaigns. The legendary version of the gunslinger alone is worth the price of admission and while some of the archetypes flag behind the book as a whole is a great addition to anyone's Pathfinder library.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Beginnings: A Feast of Flavor
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/08/2017 06:20:40

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module clocks in at 72 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page ToC, 1 page editorial, 1 page introduction,2.5 pages of SRD, 2 pages of character-sheet, 3 pages of advertisement, 1 page of back cover, leaving us with 59.5 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Now, first things first: The Legendary Beginnings-series focuses on adventures that are more family-friendly and suitable to both kids and adults that don’t want grim stuff/gore/dark material – the series focuses on exciting adventuring, but without the grimmer aspects. This adventure should run smoothly for kids ages 8+, though, depending on how sensitive the kids in question are, it may work for younger kids or, in the case of very sensitive kids, be appropriate for slightly older kids. Adults can have fun with this module as well, provided they do not mind the whimsical names and constant, food-based nomenclature of the environments in the region. There is dangerous wildlife to be found within – among others, aggressive geese. Some city-dwellers may scoff there or go “Oh no!” – if you do, you obviously haven’t grown up in the country. Geese are malicious birds. They are aggressive and their bites HURT. A lot. (Yep, I have been on the receiving end of them.) Just something to note when judging whether this module works for your kids.

The adventure is set in the world of Terrallien, the kingdom of Threll, to be more precise – that would be the same world assumed in the other Legendary Beginnings adventures and it remains open enough to allow the module to be inserted into pretty much any fantasy setting. The module is intended for 2nd level PCs and the PCs are assumed to be part of the Zekerian Order, which means they’ll have the “extra-life” zekerian amulets – basically free action heals and autoheals when reduced to 0 hp. These work only once per day, though! So yeah – they constitute a kind of “easy mode” particularly suitable for kids that are easily frustrated. More hardcore children or adults should probably not get these amulets as a safety net.

It should be noted that the adventure is presented in a sandboxy style – there is a hex-map of the environment, which is also reproduced in a player-friendly version. In themes, this can, to a degree, be seen as a continuation in themes of “Into the Feyweald” and builds to a degree on the experiences the players made there; while the product does offer handholding, it offers a bit less than adventures in the series that are designed to be “first GMing experiences.”

All right, this being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

..

.

All right, only GMs around? Great! King Ambrose of Threll has heard of reports from unhappy residents in the aptly-named town of Bakewell Tart; thus, he has chosen to send elite trouble-solvers – the PCs. Bakewell tart comes btw. with a gorgeous isometric map, player-friendly version included, and folks there are annoyed. In the school building, massive meowing was heard at night, but felines in general seem to have gone missing without a trace. Layne at the pub is faced with an onion thief; Cain the carpenter needs willow root; the pass to the church is blocked by a mountain troll (ostensibly convinced to block the path by a nefarious being – the PCs can get potions to sneak past the troll and find the culprit in the chocolate mountains); kids at school complain about nasty goblins at the lake bothering folks; Bree can’t make maple syrup and the owner of the potion shop needs something from the old willow tree and mushrooms. These quests are also represented by handout cue-cards. Nice!

Nice: There are rumors to be found and a particular character can provide the solution for the conundrum of missing cats – but he speaks only in riddles! And yes, the riddles are once again represented as handouts.

Okay, so for all these quests, there is bound to be some wilderness exploration! The PCs will have a chance to pass a majestic maple forest (and encounter dangerous wildlife, which can be scavenged and sold in town) or play rock-skipping with goblins that are extremely sore losers…so losing may actually be in the PC’s interest! If they play their cards right, they may well get some cooked fish, which they may hand to a pseudodragon…who would help the PCs, for example with onions, but a gopher is vexing him. And here, the first array of cards comes into play: The module comes with absolutely MEGA-CUTE memory-style cards of flowers, leeks, onions etc with faces so cute, I almost had an overload. Nice mini-game there!!

Anyway, there is also a little dungeon, the cranberry caves – where Guy, the svirfneblin has lured the cats – not out of ill will. You see, the deep gnome really hates rats and the caves are swarming with them. He’s offering a deal to the PCs: He’ll return the cats, go free and reward the PCs for clearing out the rats…and there are some optional rooms that contain some additional challenges, for particularly brave PCs.

The toadstool ring that can be found also sports a kind brownie – collecting maple leaves for the fellow may well reward the PCs with a magical toadstool vest that grants DR 5 versus bludgeoning damage.

At the old willow tree, a young dire weasel may make for a potential ally – provided the PCs can catch the playful animal – this is where the optional Pursuit deck comes into play, just fyi. And yes, skill-check based resolutions are provided as well.

At a forking pathway, the PCs may find a slacking faun, who is currently munching berries – in order to get him to make good on his promise, the PCs will have to succeed at social skills…or employ the optional Social Battle deck and best the faun.

Once the PCs move towards the pass blocked by the mighty troll, they may be in for a surprise: The owner of the most run-down restaurant in town is actually a disguised forlarren in league with the mighty troll! While the troll will not hunt them, he may well unleash his mountain aurochs and his mountain lion – proper and potent foes!

Once the PCs have escaped the troll’s creatures (the troll doesn’t leave the canyon – he’s been ordered to stay put), they’ll have to confront the forlarren, who, at one point, surrenders and offers releasing the troll of his duty, thus unblocking the pass. This would also be pretty much the main-quest/most difficult one.

Just fyi: Pursuit deck covers two pages à 6 cards each; the social combat deck covers 13 cards (the last card being on another page) over 3 pages; and treasure and quest cards are also included, allowing you to hand out the cards to make sure that the players don’t forget one of the small quests.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no serious hiccups in either rules-language or formal criteria. Layout adheres to a really nice two-column full-color standard and the pdf sports nice pieces of original full-color artworks. The cartography in particular deserves praise: Full-color, with player-friendly versions, the respective maps are really, really neat. The pdf comes with basic bookmarks for the chapters, which constitutes a minor criticism I have with the pdf: Nested bookmarks would have helped here. In fact, organization may well be the one thing I don’t like about the book: We first gain all the adventure-locales (bar the final sequence), then the village. Since the village is pretty much the hub for the sandbox, it would have made sense to present it first, as the wilderness encounters refer to quests that are gained in the village. Since this series assumes that both players and GMs aren’t seasoned veterans, that most assuredly would have made matters easier for the GM. Furthermore, while the cards do a good job at keeping track of the quests, I would have enjoyed a cheat-sheet one-page table summing up the bullet points of the quest for the GM, perhaps as a screen-insert or something like that. Sure, you can use the quest-cards, but while they make great handouts, they are a bit less useful for keeping track of things at one glance.

Rachel Ventura’s “A Feast of Flavor” is a wholesome adventure that oozes whimsy; apart from aforementioned dangerous wildlife, the module rewards solving combat in non-violent ways for the most part, makes clear that brains trump brawns and offers a wide variety of options. That being said, the amount of cards employed can be considered to be a bit gimmicky; still, without them, the resolutions of a couple of the challenges lose a bit of their unique nature. The best use of the cards would certainly be the cool memory game – it made for a great change of pace. The Social battle deck also was rather helpful.

Now adults or veteran players may consider a couple of these quests a bit “beneath” them, depending on how they handle whimsy; I probably wouldn’t play this with kids in puberty that want to be “totally grown up”. That being said, as a whole, this makes for a nice, flavorful offering. That being said, the organization is a bit challenging for novice GMs and the lack of an encounter map or terrain features does hurt the final encounter’s tactical challenge a bit. Still, as a whole, I consider this to be a well-made adventure worth getting. Taking all into account, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded down for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Beginnings: A Feast of Flavor
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OPERATION: NAZI SMASHER (Charity Product)
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/18/2017 17:46:04

The awesomeness in Operarion Nazi Smasher is BOOMIN! All star writers, editors, art, and maps!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
OPERATION: NAZI SMASHER (Charity Product)
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2099 Wasteland
by Seth K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/08/2017 21:23:13

2099 Wasteland is a campaign setting for a post-apocalyptic version of Earth where the player characters try to not only survive but thrive in a world where an advanced society has been all but nuked back into the dark ages. It is a campaign setting where you can run with no traditional magic and rely only on technology, or where you can try to rely on magic despite how the radioactive fallout hampers most magic.

The book also has four new classes, each with three archetypes: The Doctor is a non-magical healing class for those that relies on scientific and medical knowledge to patch people up. The Freak is a class of those who have survived what would normally be lethal radiation dosages to evolve into something else. The Mechanic is a class for those who beleive the best armor is one you customize for yourself that will protect you from a harsh and unforgiving wasteland. The Scrapper is a class for those who make technological marvels that accomplsh things previously only doable with magic.

The book also has archetypes for each of the classes from the 5e Player's Handbook and character backgrounds themed for the wastelands setting. It also has details for several new races like Androids, Gaxians, Mutants, and Smart Walkers in addition to a sidebar on how use an Awakened Animal or Plant as a PC.

There is a chapter devoted to the types of equipment found in the wastelands and how PCs (and NPCs) can modify weapons or craft custom weapons for themselves. Another chapter focuses on the new feats developed for this campaign setting. There are three pages of new spells designed for this post-apocalyptic campaign setting.

After a chapter about the new skills and rules specific to the setting, the book goes into my favorite part of the setting. The creation and growth of settlements for the setting. With the settlement rules the PCs can either try to create a small headquarters from which to recover between adventures, or try to build a new city from which civilization can spread once more. But beware of the hazards that plague the wasteland... as they can cripple or destroy an ill-prepared settlement. Settlements give the PCs a place to rest, resupply, trade and a number of other benefits, if they spend the resources to develop one or more settlements.

The book also details monsters unique to the setting, as well as Warlords that PCs can either fight against or ally with depending on the Warlord and the PCs goals. Finally the book also lists stats for Operators who are powerful NPCs that could allow with the PCs, possibly saving them if they get involved in something over their heads, or could be a threat that PCs have to deal with. If you also have the Hypercorps 2099 book, while these Operators are also in that book, their stats, personalities, and motives can be rather different in the Wasteland.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
2099 Wasteland
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Legendary Worlds: Terminus (Starfinder)
by Kim F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/02/2017 06:00:18

This was originally reviewed on the Open Gaming Network.

There is, of course, a scoring system, similar to that used elsewhere, in a 5-star rating, which we have determined as follows:

1 – Bad 2 – Mediocre 3 – Decent 4 – Good 5 * – Excellent

The following review is an OPINION piece and only reflects the opinion and tastes (because ultimately, all reviews will be based in personal taste) of the reviewer.

That disclaimer out of the way, let’s get on with the show!

This week we give you Legendary Worlds: Terminus!

Publisher: Legendary Games Author: Jeff Lee Cover Artist: None specified, but artists are listed as Arrahman rendi, Julio Rocha and Takashi Tan System: Starfinder Page count: 18 ( 1 page cover, 1 page inside cover, 1 page credits, 3 page OGL (interesting choice, starting that at the front along with your “About Legendary Games” – I’ll be honest, it’s a bit off-putting. Why not have your “About” on the inside cover, or along with the Table of Contents?), 1 page Table of Contents, 9 pages of content, 1 page back inside cover, 1 page back cover)

Right, so let’s look at the cover first. It shows us two people who appear to be in prison. One wearing some sort of plate mail, and electricity coming out of his fist, and the other, with their back turned, bald (possibly an elf? Not sure if the ears are pointy enough), carrying something that I can’t actually see what is, as the image is blurred over there, but it looks like some sort of long-handled dagger, while that person is wearing plate mail pieces as well as a more barbaric looking fur collar. Right, so this image is of a prison break, at least that’s how I read it, though if I’d had to guess from the image, it’s not a particularly high-tech prison, and more like something I’d find on a low-tech world. A bit odd for Starfinder, but when looking at the other Legendary Worlds releases, it looks to fit their overall feel.

Right, to the content!

So, I’m going to skip straight past the Table of Contents and the OGL beginner there on this inside, and move to the “Welcome to the Legendary Planet Adventure Path”.

OK, the pages labeled 1 and 2 are basically a short history of “This is what inspired Legendary Planet” and by extension “Legendary Worlds”, and it doesn’t really add or detract from the books. It’s nice to see people acknowledging where their inspiration came from, but I’d hoped for more of a “This is how you use this book in your campaigns, whether it’s Legendary Planet or not”, especially as the blurb for the product on the websites state “You can use these in conjunction with an ongoing adventure saga like the Legendary Planet Adventure Path from Legendary Games or with any sci-fi campaign that spans the spaceways.” – And yeah, it is pretty “drag-and-drop”, but nonetheless, it would have been nice to see.

Then we have an introduction to Terminus, as well as a short Planetary Gazetteer, giving us surface conditions (nice touch) and gravity. While the information is there, it doesn’t really stick to Starfinder’s formula for it, so you need to read the whole text block, instead of getting a quick overview. While that’s fine, it would have been nice to have a quick overlook as well.

And here starts the juicy bits: The locations, the factions, the inhabitants, and the conditions. They’re all here, but they are a bit hodge-podge, as they don’t adhere to a particular order. It starts with a location, then a faction, then another location (well, inside), then another faction and so on. It’d have been nice for it to be “Locations, Factions, Condition, Inhabitants” or something similar.

All the locations, factions are pretty cool, though I’d have liked a bit more information on the Overseers. Leaving it as a mystery is a bit annoying. It’d have been nice to know WHO was abusing these folks and why, but oh well. What’s REALLY cool about this though, is the Corruption, Chimaerism, and Undead sections. I like the call-out to people devolving more quickly here than elsewhere (though I’m sure the duergar wouldn’t call it that), and the increase in rises of corporeal undead, i.e. automatic rising. I’d have liked there to be some sort of time frame for when they arose, but as a GM, I’d probably hand-wave it and go “Within 1d6 hours” as the clans are described as taking their time to destroy the bodies of other inmates immediately after death, which seems to require some sort of time pressure. The fact that races that are normally infertile together can have children here, is a VERY nice touch. (Finally an excuse for owlbears! – well, sort of!)

Next up is a more in-depth description of the Clans of Terminus, so maybe this’ll reveal a bit more.

It details 3 clans, the All-folk (the casts out offspring from parents of mixed races), the Glorified (a bunch of power-hungry maniacs who believe that Terminus is a test of faith) and the Ironmongers (who specialize in destroying wardens). All of these are well detailed, but most detail is given to the Glorified. And I am lacking an answer to WHY the Ironmongers are so keen on destroying the wardens. I mean, sure, every prisoner likely wants to kill the guards, but why are these guys so set on it, that they prefer attacking wardens to taking over other clans?

Next up we get a few monsters, the blackfire wight and terminus warden. The Blackfire wights are undead who’ve been killed by blackfire (an environmental hazard on Terminus, that’s described a bit later), but they’re actually CR 6, where the Blackfire itself is CR 4. AND they can create spawn. They just seem a bit overpowered for something that was killed by an environmental hazard. I would have expected them to be a lower CR, than the hazard itself, especially since they can guard the actual black fire.

The terminus warden is a large robot, that has a weakness to critical hits, which I think is really odd. Constructs are already susceptible to critical hits, but does this mean that the warden takes 50% more damage from critical hits? (It’s also vulnerable to electricity, but that’s a common thing for metallic constructs). It’s pretty cool and has some nice artwork.

One thing that’s important to note here, is that the Starfinder Alien Archive has not been launched yet, so these monsters do deviate from the standard that will be established there, looking at First Contact, you can for example see that the Terminus Warden has feats that would not be listed in that entry for Starfinder as it only lists the active abilities. I’m hoping this’ll be updated once Alien Archive becomes available. The Ration Replicator ability is a nice touch as well, though it probably won’t see much use in a normal game.

Next up is New Rules, a section on a hazard (blackfire), stygia (a drug), 2 weapons and an armor. A side note to two of these, it would have been nice to have a page reference to them or even a “see below for details”, for both blackfire and stygia, as they’re both referenced before we see them, within this product. Having a little note stating that “yes, you’ll be able to read more about them later” would have been nice.

Blackfire can be roughly described as a magical backlash effect, and your spellcasters will soon learn not to use area of effect spells near the nightglass mineral deposits, as it’s going to hurt. Stygia is a drug that provides spell resistance (wow!) and immunity to blackfire, but here we run into some real problems. Because it’s not clear what the withdrawal effects are. It merely states that “an addicted creature goes a full day without a dose of the drug, then it suffers the effects listed.” – it would have been nice to restate what these actually are here.

The equipment in this section is also OK, as 2 of them are just variants of existing Starfinder equipment, but the Magebane Bomb is cool. Being able to deliver a Hazard as a weapon is a smart move on the author’s part.

Lastly, you have some adventure hooks, which are pretty standard fare for a prison planet, an Escape (hello Riddick), an Infiltration (hello Escape from New York / Los Angeles), and a Survival (Running Man/Battle Royale!). While they’re standard fare, they’re also pretty evocative, so there’s no need to re-invent the wheel here.

And so we come to the conclusion:

This is a decent (3½-star). I feel like this had the potential to be a 4-star product, but there’s a number of small missteps, and it is annoying with the short introduction being a bit of a shambles. Along with the critical weakness in the terminus warden, and so on, I can’t justify rounding it up from 3½ to 4, so I’m going to have to settle on a 3 star.

Sorry, folks, but this one could have provided better, and while it has the potential, it could use another look. If those issues are addressed (not so much the order of the items, but the other niggling bits), this would become a 4-star instead.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Worlds: Terminus (Starfinder)
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2099 Wasteland
by Gabriel G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/01/2017 03:24:58

The classes are ok, althought the scrapper is a total deception, the class description does not match at all what is written, i was expection a narrow selection of spell with a specific explanation for each of them and how they work, it is just said choose your spell and say you build some cool device out of scraps that does the same as the spell. The provided archetypes are bland to my opinion

The items are interesting, but the weaponry is just a copy paste from D20 modern. The races are ok again. I found nothing beyond "ok" except 3 things mentionned at the end.

My main concerns are that everything feels bland and/or looks like it's been copy paste from something else, also the separation from magic and technology isn't there. I expected a world withouth magic or at least rules and options to make a world withouth magic. Also the arts either look great or very cheap, most of them does not look good at all.

Another personnal issue is that the system isnt made with the 5e mindset (no scaling, lack of proficiency bonus use, flat + bonuses)

The reason this isnt a 1/5 is because of the work done on the settlement, living in the wasteland, hazards and custom weaponry creation (more of that! custom monster creation for DM, custom armor, custom robots, customs maps and customs items. guideline for these would have definitively added actual worth to the book)

with what i got i would have paid at best 10$



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
2099 Wasteland
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Malevolent Medium Monsters
by Chemlak G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/20/2017 16:07:56

Magnificent Marvelous Monsters Make Me Masterfully Merry

If I have one single gripe about the Pathfinder rules, it's that high-CR almost always equals big. I have always enjoyed coming across monsters that are medium or smaller and tougher than your average bear (or level 8 Barbarian, at least).

Enter Malevolent Medium Monsters from Legendary Games. I heaved a huge sigh of relief when I saw this, not least because I know that LG can pull it out of the bag.

And then I bought it.

Hooo boy!

Please ignore the fact that this is part of the "Righteous Crusade" AP Plug-ins. This book is great for anyone playing a level 10+ game.

The Good I could go through everything in here (and I expect Endzeitgeist will when he reaches this product in his schedule), and drool over how utterly awesome everything is, but that's not me, so here we go with some high points:

The Alabaster Beetle. This thing is terrifying. Whatever genius came up with the idea of an underground beetle that can burrow, fly, spray paralytic poison, reproduce asexually, and is invisible to dark vision, is simply... a genius. A sick, twisted, my-kind-of-evil genius. CR 12 and comes in groups of up to 20. Because players need to learn fear, sometimes.

Homonculous Dragon. Oh, hell, yes. It's... well, it's sort of the best (or worst, depending on your perspective) of all dragons. This round it might be breathing a cone of electricity, next round a line of ice. And its aura might be acid this round. Fire the next. Or something else. Because being predictable gets you killed. And being unpredictable tends to kill PCs.

Fiendfused. Okay, I want more of these. A lot more. A whole book more. Preferably with Mythic versions. Because... oh, there is nothing not to love about these: they're people who died while they were possessed by a fiend, and the fiend merged with the mortal body and... awesome fiendish stuff happened. Like the one based on the balor that has an explosion every time it takes a critical hit. Or the marilith-based one that has four arms and infuses its weapons with magic. Or the pit fiend one... you get the idea.

The Bad Nitpick time! I like all of the monsters in this book, so that leaves me looking for things that are missing, don't make sense, or just seem out of place... and there's so little.

Save vs what? I can calculate a DC as well as the next guy (27, since you're asking), but the Bedlam Breath ability of the homonculous dragon is missing it from the entry.

Free metamagic? Maybe? Weirdly, this is another "issue" with the homonculous dragon (which is one of my favourite creatures in this book!). It has an ability to spend points from a pool to add metamagic feats to its sorcerer spells. It's a free action to spend the points, and it adds the feats on the fly, but... I can't tell if the casting time increases like it would normally for a sorcerer casting a metamagic spell. Part of me wants to say "yes, it does, be consistent", and the rest of me wants to say "CR 16, this thing should be nasty, let it be completely free!" I'd have liked it spelling out in the text.

The Conclusion If it's not clear, I'm Legendary Games fanboying again. This is wonderful. Thurston Hillman and Jesse Benner have absolutely knocked it out of the park. Other than my minor issues with what I spotted in the homonculous dragon, this is just thoroughly amazing. Clearly it's not perfect, but it's focused on a gap in the market that has been bugging me for years, and that cuts it a huge amount of slack. I'm going to use this book just as soon as I can. This is not something I can leave on my drive and forget about, because if nothing else it gave me fiendfused and I just want more of them (even if I have to make them myself). I can't help it, one day Legendary Games will produce something that I can't just enthuse about from start to finish. 5/5.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Malevolent Medium Monsters
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