DriveThruRPG.com
Browse Categories
 Publisher Info











Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Elite Dangerous RPG core book
by Randall S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/21/2018 09:37:35

A review based on entire pdf, in progress:

Good

1: setting allows for variable campaigns 2: simple system that fits setting, including both spaceship and individual combat. 3: layout is fantastic and the text speaks to you as a reader rather than directly dumping info/stat blocks at you. 4: random tables make a bit of a mini game for adventure setting creation.

Bad

1: no pdf bookmarks or links. 2: on iphone, not accessability-friendly; i.e. siri cannot read it aloud. (superbad in a negative way) 3: price sucks for what it lacks vs what a reader would expect. 4: world description could use an expansion because it seems based for people who know the setting through playing the video game.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Elite Dangerous RPG core book
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Star Trek Adventures Quickstart
by Rion S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/11/2018 18:47:19

A good intro to the game, helps explain some of the newer gaming concepts well. If you are considering buying in, check this one out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Star Trek Adventures Quickstart
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Legacy: Life Among the Ruins 2nd Edition
by Carl A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/29/2018 22:51:07

One of the more extensive modifications of the Apocalypse World rules, I found this version to have some excellent ideas and structure changes. It is also one of the best at handling different scales. You have two "characters" you play. One is a character in the more traditional sense, but the main character is actually a familiy of people that single character is from. I use the term "people" pretty loosely here. One of the families are synthetic beings, and another are uplifted animals.

Families have needs, and surpluses. Those resources (or the lack of the same) are a driving force for motivation. One of your figured attributes is the difference between the two of these totals (number of surpluses - number of needs), named "Mood". You have to roll that when the Family is under adverse conditions, so you want to get rid of your needs and maximize your wants so your family doesn't crack when things get hard and the GM decides you need to see if they "Hold Together".

Another great aspect of the system is the Quick Character system. If one of the Players wants to go off and persue a section of the map (that you all built together in the first session) for some goal it often won't make sense for everyone's character to go along. But rather than sitting out that part of the game, you make a Quick Character which is another member of their family with a reduced amount of detail comapred to a full PC. This way everyone can still be involved and not feel like they have nothing to do if the session focuses on someone else for a while.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legacy: Life Among the Ruins 2nd Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Coriolis: Aram's Ravine
by Marc C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/26/2018 13:54:27

« a complete scenario location for the award-winning Coriolis »

The use of the words «scenario location» was confusing to me. While their are descriptions of several locations, important NPCs and possible interactions between them and PCs, you will not find any detailed plans of buildings or an actual scenario/mission for the players. There are only two short paragraphs of possible adventures hooks at the end of the PDF. The GM has to do all the hard work. I didn't find what I was looking for but what is included is well written and engaging.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: Aram's Ravine
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
by Glenn F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/21/2018 15:39:17

Take a long hard look at this game - it's got a great deal of promise.

A neat stat and skill based system with a 2(or more)d20 resolution mechanic that cleverly folds in special effects and varying success alongside levels of skill mastery and raw talent.

Armour and basic defences soak damage and circumstances increase difficulty. Effects add unique outcomes for different weapons and will work the same for spells.

Momentum is a group based mechnic that replaces your usual 'special' or 'critical' successes and can be shared with other players interchangeably with combat and non-combat skills.

Fortune are powerful 'Luck Points' and 'Doom' - Doom is something you buy for extra oomph when you need it, that the GM can spend later to fuel changes in circumstances or enemy spells (sorcery is nasty - just like the books).

DISCLAIMER: The above detail isn't designed to give you a pocket guide to the system, it's designed to make you ask the kinds of question that will lead you to the pages of the Quickstart, and hopefully, to a game run with them.

Only then will you understand what I've said, and a lot more besides.

Conan is shaping up to be a well-researched 'true telling' of the world as originally envisioned, and is supported by a rules system that suits it well. If you read elsewhere that the 'Doom' mechnic 'ruins' the game, do yourself the favour of ignoring the 'doom-mongers' (ironic yes?) and trying it out yourself. I don't think most people critiquing it bothered to actually play...

An elegant system and THE Swords and Sorcery world as a combo deal. What more can you ask for?



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Coriolis: The Dying Ship
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/15/2018 10:47:37

This adventure is a classic tale of a ship that has gone silent and off course, with the party sent to discover what's amiss, sort it out and recover a valuable cargo hauler and its load. The text begins with a detailed explanation of what has gone wrong and how it all came about, masses of beautiful detail that's enlightening for the GM but does raise the question of how easy it will be to enable the party to discover it all for themselves.

The adventure is well-resourced, with plenty of handouts and five pre-generated characters for groups who want to start straight away and have no characters of their own. Using your own characters is, however, a viable option. There are also some interesting comments about pacing the adventure, which can be done in a session or two if the group is time-strapped, or played out in a more leisurely manner for groups who like to explore every aspect of a given situation. Like any adventure, a thorough understanding and preparation on the part of the GM repays dividends. The situation is quite dangerous and should a player-character die, suggestions are made as to how best to replace them.

In classic style, the party is on Coriolis when they are approached and invited to a meeting at a cantina... and arrive to find another bunch impersonating them! Once this is sorted out - and several options are provided for you to use depending on how the party reacts - their contact will explain the delicate nature of the mission to be undertaken and enlist their help. He's in quite a rush to get their answer and be on the way... even going so far as to say he'll answer all the questions that they likely have once en route.

The trip to the oddly-behaving ship is relatively straightforward, although a few events are provided should you want to make a bit more of it. They may find out a bit more about the fellow who hired them as well. Once they arrive, the first trick is to get aboard. The hauler is already dangerously close to an asteroid swarm, which would probably destroy it if its course cannot be changed. The ship is dark, appears mostly powered-down, and the party's hails go unanswered. Once aboard, it is a creepy search to find the answers that they seek and regain control of the ship before it is all too late.

The exploration of the ship is handled in an elegant manner: it's completely up to the party what they do. The ship is described clearly, and certain things will occur in certain places... but only when the party reaches those places. Other events can be triggered as you feel appropriate. There's lots of atmospheric descriptions and ancillary notes making it all very easy to build up the air of suspense necessary... and of course that asteroid field is getting closer by the minute!

Overall it's an outstanding adventure, mixing traditional 'dead ship' tropes with some of the unique background and mythology of the Coriolis RPG (although if you are minded to get a bit mystical you could retool it for other spacefaring games). This has the potential to make a memorable story indeed.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: The Dying Ship
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Coriolis: Aram's Ravine
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/14/2018 10:30:43

This supplement introduces Aram's Ravine, the only settlement on a planet called Jina which is by all accounts a bit of a hellhole that you only want to visit if you are after bauxite and other minerals... or adventure, with rival individuals constantly bickering and intriguing against one another.

Jina is barely habitable, with acid storms, temperature extremes, dried-up oceans and icy poles. You are recommended to check out the comments on this planet in the core rulebook to put this settlement into context. The colony is a hub for everyone exploiting the resources of the planet. It's perched on the edge of a ravine in a place with odd geology that has led to the formation of several 'towers' of rock between which softer rock has been eroded away - and the settlement itself is located on several of the towers, linked by rather precarious-looking bridges.

There is a plan of the settlement, atmospherically presented in a way that represents the rather misty atmosphere. This mist is acidic and slowly eats away at anything and everything (including people!) left out in it. Locations of interest include a palatial bath house or hammam, cantinas, a chapel of the Icons, Colonial Agency office, a small medical facility and a witch doctor's office. Outside the settlement there's a local population of fiercely tribal xenophobic 'kalites', acid-resistant humanites who are fairly primitive, although probably less so than most people give them credit for. There's some description of the surrounding area, which is where the mines can be found.

Then we get to meet some of the personalities in the settlement. The Colonial Agent. The (self-proclaimed) Mine Lord. The Salt Witch. These are the three rivals, and there are other subsiduary NPCs as well.

Then there are a series of events, beginning with a note that any new arrivals - like the party - will immediately be drawn into the scheming and plotting that's going on whether they like it or not. And that's before any set=piece events take place. Both of the ideas presented are ripe for development into full-blown adventures, and are open-ended enough that you can put your own spin on them.

Another fascinating location replete with opportunity for adventure!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: Aram's Ravine
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Fallout: Wasteland Warfare – Rules of Play
by Séan J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/13/2018 22:56:14

Well done with good explanations. Excellent artwork, with no obviously exploitable games theory errors.

A bit on the complicated side, but a welcome fusion of RPG and table-top blitzes.

BZ, Dev Team!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Fallout: Wasteland Warfare – Rules of Play
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Coriolis: The Mahanji Oasis
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/13/2018 09:40:23

Labau is an arid and hot desert planet, but if something takes the party there, they will be glad of a lush oasis to visit... so here it is. A few reasons for why they might be there are provided, and reading through the notes on Labau in the core rulebook may suggest others. The oasis and the lakes nearby are clearly visible from orbit.

There's an overview of the oasis and a more detailed description of the village of Mahanji and some of the notable places: a cantina, the caravan seraglio, and premises belonging to petroleum companies. There's also an area called the Wall of Dreams where you can find, er, individuals of negotiable affection. OK, that's where the brothels are. Apparently caravanners, petroleum workers and workers from the starport are all regular patrons.

There's a map of the area supplemented by a sort of labelled skectch of the village itself which gets across what's where in a very atmospheric way. There are notes on every location noted on the map and sketch. and some might think - if you don't mind the high temperatures - that it might be a nice place to establish a base...

Of course, then we hear about the simmering tensions between various groups. The Firstcomer natives aren't too happy about those prospecting for petroleum. There are rumours about illicit experiments going on in the Factory (which does bionics research). Something odd is going on around some ancient ruins... and now people have started to disappear. Things are coming to a head, and of course do so when the party is there, irrespective of why they have actually come! There are detailed notes on the main personalities involved (including stat blocks if required) and a series of events that will blow the lid off things. You could pile all of these up at once or - especially if you expect the party to be frequent visitors to the oasis - spread them out a bit, for each is capable of being developed into a full-blown adventure in its own right. This provides for a lot of flexibility, and the range of events means that you can pick which ones to develop based on what you know of the party or even which of the rumours flying around catches their interest!

A fascinating little settlement to visit in its own right, and with all this going on the party may be in for a long stay. Well worth a look!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: The Mahanji Oasis
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Coriolis: Hamurabi
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/12/2018 08:11:48

This supplement presents a location which can provide a resting place, a source of adventure or indeed be a place in which adventures take place: a portal station in the Hamura system. It orbits the system's star and is more or less equidistant between the two portals in the system. Being the only station in system, people using either portal are likely to visit. It boasts just over an hundred permanent residents, and has all the facilities you might need: cantina, souk, chapel, a medlab, and residential modules, some of which are available for rent by transients. There's also a 'coffin hostel' for those who cannot afford proper rooms for their stay.

The descriptions of the place bring plenty of local colour and atmosphere to help you bring it alive for the party. There's a general plan based on a labelled line drawing of a side elevation of the station and some illustrations as well. The station is directed by Akbar Rhavinn Bokor, who has offices and a fine residence. There's also a Colonial Office which deals with such matters as the registration of mining claims and ensuring that things intended for any colony end up at the right one... there's plenty of work hauling goods and information for those in need of a contract.

Next, the current situation is discussed. Various personalities come into play and there are several points of tension - such as ice miners from a nearby planet getting a bit rowdy on leave - that can serve as backdrop or even focus of adventures as desired. There are descriptions (and stat blocks, should you need them) for the major players in the various operations on the station and a few events that may occur as appropriate during the party's stay beginning with a 'welcoming committee' as soon as they dock. There's also a suggestion for a complete mini-adventure.

It all gives the impression of a bustling little haven of light out there in the black, a place that operates all the time whether or not the party are there. You'll need to provide extra detail to build events into full-blown encounters or to develop that mini-adventure but there's a sound framework on which to build. Definitely a place to visit, maybe the party will even make it a regular stopping-place in their travels.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: Hamurabi
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Coriols: Artifacts & Faction Tech
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/11/2018 11:28:33

Artefacts are the most valuable things that the party is likely to get its hands on, conferring great power or wealth in whoever's got them. There's some brief advice to the GM about where (and when) to make them available, and a note about the glyphs they are often covered with. A few are thought to be understood, but nobody's certain about what they mean, let alone being able to read them properly... perhaps there's a 'Rosetta Stone' out there to find?

Then comes a listing of artefacts ready for you to use. Each has a visual description (and often a picture) along with notes on what it can do, limitations or drawbacks... and what skills the party can use to figure it out. But that's not all. There are numerous sidebars that discuss various aspects of artefacts to further enhance your use of them in your game.

Unfortunately many artefacts do their stuff by manipulating energy streams that lie dangerously close to the Dark Between the Stars. For those that do, there's a note of how many Darkness Points are generated for the GM when it's used. If you are too bedazzled by the artefacts presented here to choose which of the over sixty presented here, there's a random selection table to roll on.

There are quite a few healing devices of various levels of power - most will be pretty scary for both the injured person and any bystanders when they are used, particularly if they haven't seen the particular artefact in action before. In fact, many of the artefacts have the potential to scare users...

The second part of the book covers Faction Technology. Unlike the mysterious artefacts, this is the cutting edge of contemporary development, often from hidden programmes of development that each faction desperately wants to hide from all its rivals. They're presented by faction with two or three signature items from each one. Often they reflect the faction's particular interests or strengths. Weapons and armour predominate, but there are ships and the intriguing proxy technology, an immersive alternate reality developed by Ahlam's Temple which they use sparingly for education or to allow experiences otherwise impossible - things like giving disabled individuals the use of the limbs or senses they cannot use in real life. Is this a blessing or a curse?

Providing a tantalising glimpse into both faction tech and the even stranger artefacts, these are items the average party should find only rarely, but when they do it's a reminder of how rich and strange the universe is. The one thing this work doesn't do is assign any values to anything listed here. Perhaps they are priceless. Or maybe it is up to the party to negotiate if they wish to part with the item in question. Maybe it's too dangerous to hawk them around... Whatever, they'll blow your mind. Sometimes literally.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriols: Artifacts & Faction Tech
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Elite Dangerous RPG - Super Traders Sourcebook
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/10/2018 09:08:54

A lot of interstellar travel is going to be about trade, and this book is filled with resources to help those groups who want at least part of their game to be about furthering that trade - presumably as small-scale independents, given that the game is centred around individual spacecraft. With spacecraft ownership proposed on the scale that we own cars, these are probably the van-men of space in the equivalent of a step-van or small truck. It's also something that can be modelled well for someone wanting a solo game.

First up, Advanced Trading. If you are a role-playing group, a lot of trade will be relegated to the Between Adventures phase. Let's face it, commerce - however necessary and valuable - isn't really the stuff of adventure. However the rules as laid out in the core rulebook make for quite a lot of work, especially for the GM. Unless your GM has unlimited prep time, you probably want him to be creating exciting adventures not writing out price lists. So a more flexible system for working out prices in a given system based on what they specialise in and a bit of die rolling for that random element is provided, with the intention that (provided you like it) it will repace the version in the core rules. Interestingly, this includes an element to model a place that is good for trade being over-exploited, ensuring that the characters move on and don't just run a single profitable route without exploring anywhere else. You can make things more complex, but that really defeats the purpose of using this system.

Next comes New Spaceships. Everyone is always ready for a few more... and the ones presented include large bulk carriers - think 'container ship' rather than 'truck' - for those who want to take cargo-hauling seriously. There requite multiple-person crews, but come with 'hangers' for personal vessels, so characters won't have to abandon their pride and joy if they take service on one of these big boys (the price tag is likely too much for most characters to contemplate owning one). There are also smaller one- or two-man ships optimised to carry cargo at, of course, the expense of speed, manoeuvrability or weaponry.

This section is followed by another on Fighter Escorts - as the big cargo haulers are not able to fight well, they need to have escorts to defend them. The concept here is the small specialist fighting craft, carried aboard a larger vessel and loosed when the need arises. They are smaller than the regular personal vessels previously discussed in this game, basically a flying weapons platform - some are even controlled remotely rather than having a pilot aboard. They have limited life support even if designed to be piloted, and no Frame Shift drives.

Next up is It Takes All Sorts, a selection of backgrounds suitable for people who want to specialise in trade. People have all sorts of reasons for becoming independent traders, these provide some of them - often involving a desire (or a need) to escape the past. Additional Karma Capabilities round out this section.

The Eternal Foe comes next. This section talks a little about pirates before provided a selection of adversaries at spaceship, vehicle and individual scales... mostly pirates but also some other traders to provide a bit of competition!

Finally, this is all linked in to the Random Gemeration System (RGS). There's an explanation of how to use it to create a solo game - this dupliates notes in the Military and Espionage supplements, as you may not have them - of course if you do you can have a very varied solo game indeed! It then moves on to creating encounters suitable for a trading game, as useful for the GM wanting to create appropriate challenges as to the solo gamer, including pirate attacks, police boarding actions and general spaceway encounters. There's a selection of trade missions - all of which could be developed into full-blown adventures, with plenty of supporting notes. In places the other sourcebooks are mentioned, but alternatives are given for those who don't possess them.

There's a lot of good stuff here, particularly if you are on your own or want to run a game in which trading and commerce provides the background to the adventures you want to run. A lot would be useful whatever science-fiction game you run, even if it's not Elite Dangerous, but if you do it captures the very essence of the video game well.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Elite Dangerous RPG - Super Traders Sourcebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Elite Dangerous RPG - Espionage Supplement
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/09/2018 09:03:17

The opening pages (backed by an atmospheric double-page illustration) paint a world that's post-post-truth. Everyone knows not to leave secrets on computers where hackers can break in... so if you want those secrets you have to break in physically to steal them. Espionage is part and parcel of doing business, with corporations even more likely to indulge in it than nation-states.

Slightly oddly, the first section is addressed to Engineers, and talks about upgrading spaceships by tinkering with the systems - in flagrant breach of the warrantry if not the law. Pilots are advised not to fiddle, a case of 'no user-servicable parts inside' which to those of us who like playing starship engineers is anathema! It is considered best to go to a professional if you want to supe up your spaceship, and the first trick is to make contact with a reputable and competent one. In terms of game mechanics, use your Repair skill in the Between Adventures phase if you want to do it yourself. It's probably best to visit your tame professional engineer then as well, who wants to spend role-playing time waiting for your spaceship to come out of the shop? Either way it's going to be expensive. There are tables to roll on for various components, giving a chance of improvement... or of causing a fault (and sometimes both!).

Next comes a selection of New Spaceships. It's noted that agents tend to like ships that are speedy and agile, but which don't stand out in a crowded starport, then presents several new ships (each with variations) that may be chosen during character creation, or indeed picked up later on in the game.

The next section is Perks of the Job. This contains useful equipment that the best-dressed espionage agent wouldn't leave home without. Some are quite innovative - poisonous lipsticks or bodyspray for example (just remember to take the antidote before applying or you'll poison yourself!). There are weapons, cybernetics and othe gizmos as well.

Then we have The Perfect Agent where new backgrounds appropriate to someone wishing to enter the shadowy worlds of espionage are provided. These range from a former downtrodden worker-drone who knows in great detail how a corporation operates to security guards, and an 'insurgent' who may be a prankster, an activist or an outright terrorist. New enhancements and Karma Capabilities appropriate to these roles are also there.

After a rather creepy piece of fiction which I hope won't give any players ideas we move on to The Bad Guys, which provides a whole bunch of ready-made opponents. These come in both Spaceship and Individual scales and range from soldier/mercenary and security personnel to criminals, and of course assassins.

The final part of the book focusses on the Random Generation System (RGS) and concentrates on running solo adventures when you are without a GM. Of course busy GMs can also use it during planning or even mid-game if they need ideas in a hurry. There are infiltration challenges - complete with outcomes based on success or failure - and step-by-step paths through various types of espionage mission. Then there is a system for generating Corporate Bases through a series of die rolls.

There's plenty of useful stuff if you want to run espionage games, but the whole thing has an air of being thrown together, random nuggets added because they might be useful, rather than a coherent exposition of the espionage aspects of the game. It even manages to make espionage sound dull and mechanical... the very thing most people take up this line of work to escape! Pick out all the bits you want to use and throw them into the mix, remembering that the real excitement of an espionage-style mission comes with role-playing it, not just rolling dice!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Elite Dangerous RPG - Espionage Supplement
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Fallout: Wasteland Warfare – Rules of Play
by Phillip H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/07/2018 19:12:59

Got the freebie to check out the game. Opinion is needlessly complicated mechanics. Background didn't do much for me either.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Fallout: Wasteland Warfare – Rules of Play
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Elite Dangerous RPG core book
by ar e. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/05/2018 01:18:56

An excellent product all around. Getting this out of the way: If you're a fan of the Elite Dangerous game and universe, this is what you're looking for in a tabletop RPG. The writers are clearly fans of the game and have gone to great pains to bring the game as directly into the mechanics of the RPG as possible (particularly where ships and their components are concerned), and it comes out really well. Overall it's a sleek system with tons of options for customization, yet minimal numbers crunch.

The PDF itself is just magnificent. The art is nice, the fonts and layout are easy on the eyes and aesthetically pleasing, everything is nicely color-coded to quickly draw your eyes to what needs referencing... It's one of those PDFs that made me realize just how important aesthetics can be on the reading process, despite not usually thinking much about it. It doesn't lack for content, either. There are at least two dozen background options for your characters, which you'll pick from to put together a unique individual whose experiences have shaped their skillset right out of the gate. Ships all come with several different stock models - for example, the Adder "Aspire" Coupe is kitted as something of a personal cruising vessel, while the Adder Raider feels more like an interceptor - and of course, you can hand-craft your own ship by mixing and match components and balancing power needs the way you would ingame. There are even rules for creating your vessel from the video game, if you played, in the RPG. NPCs are fairly easy to make, and the book comes loaded with numerous stock encounters; different strengths of foe graded by their rank (from Harmless to Elite) for each of three groups: soldiers and mercs, police and security, and criminals.

I tend to ramble and I'm trying to abbreviate as much as possible, so I won't gush on, but it's absolutely worth the money. As a space RPG on its own, it does a really solid job, on par with some of my favorite spacefaring tabletop RPGs. As a way for fans of the video game to transfer their experience to a fully fleshed out universe complete with planetary interactions, personal-scale firefights and of course, exciting space dogfighting (or even mining if that's your thing!), it does its job almost perfectly.

I have only two complaints: One is the lack of comprehensive ship listing, which I believe is remedied in some of the expansion material but I haven't purchased those to make sure yet. Make no mistake, what's here gives you a ton of options. The Adder, Anaconda, Asp Explorer, Cobra Mk III, Diamondback Scout, Eagle Mk II, Fer-de-Lance, Hauler, Krait, Python, Sidewinder, Type-6, Type-7, Type-9, Viper Mk III, and the Vulture make up the ship roster in the core book, and that's nothing to laugh at. Particularly when you consider that each of these models come with something like three or four different stock configurations (and again, can be modified to your heart's content!). That said, I'm hoping to find the faction ships and cruise liners in the expansions. If not, I'm hopeful that the faithfulness to the source material will make them easy enough to translate homebrew!

The other complaint I have is the slight lack of depth in the mission generation tables. I don't want to call it "lack of depth", really. The mission generation system is really cool and it does its job very well. The only thing that worries me is... Within each of the three mission types, there are a handful of missions, each with a handful of scenarios and a handful of twists that could be rolled. The positive in this is that the generated results tend to feel really exciting and unique, but the downside is... Well, I was sort of hoping for D100 tables rather than D10's. This, however, is a personal gripe and a minor one at that. I'm fairly certain these generated missions will help my table get rolling and our own ideas will carry it from there, so they'll likely do their job just fine!

All in all, I can't recommend this product enough. I'd been waiting for this since I first took the controls of my crappy stock Sidewinder some year and a half ago, and the folks at Spidermind have delivered in a way that almost feels tailor-made to my wishes.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Elite Dangerous RPG core book
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 276 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates